Tag archives for National Geographic

A Little Less Digital, A Lot Less Nomad

It’s summer in Washington and I’m very glad to be home. I do love to travel and that will never change, but I also love waking up in my own time zone and enjoying a meal without juggling my phone and fork. I hope you understand. It’s impossibly hard to step away from a dream…

New Havana

“I wanted to see Cuba,” explains one man in our group, “Before it changes.” We all nod in agreement, except for the two Cubans in the room, who simply smirk. “I’ve been hearing that for the last twenty years!” says Migdalia, our guide. And she’s right—I’ve been hearing (and saying) the same thing for the…

Tracking Gorillas in Rwanda

I never in a million years ever believed I would get to spend time with gorillas in the wild. The shock of living the pages of National Geographic magazine, over and over, is what makes this 125th Anniversary Expedition so spectacular. For me, Rwanda marked the final stop in what has been, truly, a life-changing…

Perks of a Private Jet

I didn’t always travel like this (I am quite content just riding Greyhound), but for those of you who’ve asked what it’s like to hop about the globe on a private jet, I’m happy to report that as modes of transportation go, this one has several real advantages:

Diving with Sylvia Earle in Palau

She’s the happiest woman in the world with a dour message of doom. “Half of the world’s coral reefs are now gone—or at least in a state of severe decline,” says Oceanographer and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, Sylvia Earle. She’s reporting a tragic truth that I’ve witnessed firsthand—bleached and broken coral in the Caribbean, Hawaii and…

Don’t Kiss the Jellyfish

Approximately five million jellyfish live in Ongeim’l Tketau—give or take a hundred thousand. This South Pacific city of Cnidarians only came to the world’s attention in 1982, thanks to an article in National Geographic Magazine that detailed Palau’s endemic jellyfish species, Mastigias papua etpisoni, found only in this single marine lake and nowhere else in…

A Night in Kathmandu

From our plane, the city looks as if some fitful child scattered all of his Legos across a blanket of green. Every colored block, some red brick, pale pink, or sea green—is home to a family or two or three, a shop or restaurant, probably cows and goats, too. And all these homes, multiplied by…

Seven Skies

“When you reach an empty part of the desert, if the wind blows from the North, then West, South, and East—if the wind comes from every direction, this means, ‘You are not welcome here’, and you need to leave immediately.” Such is the helpful advice of Mohammed on the microphone, his last-minute lecture—‘Intro to Genies’—right…

Photo Gallery: A Day In Oman

Is it possible to fall in love with a place in just one day? Yes, of course. The answer is yes. After leaving London on National Geographic’s 125th Anniversary Expedition, we flew to Oman, and shifted suddenly from the cooler fall of Europe into the steamy season of the Gulf. In total, I believe we…

Dead Reckoning

“You only know where you are by remembering how you got there.” So says our professor, anthropologist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Wade Davis, explaining the sailors’ process of navigation, dead reckoning. He stands in the aisle of the plane, gesturing with his hands, while on either side, a dozen flat screen TV monitors all show…