Tag archives for Bus2Antarctica

All good things must end, and the same goes for amazing journeys. We’ve managed to draw out the conclusion of Andrew Evans’ Bus2Antarctica trip here on the blog, in part because we had so much content and in part because we’re not really ready to let go. But let go we must. So here, Andrew…

Andrew Evans gets a taste of Falklands hospitality on Carcass Island. Carcass Island is perhaps the least appetizing name for destination dining, but that’s exactly where I went to eat. As the name implies, I did see a few carcasses on the island, mostly little lumps of penguin bones–the sad endings of a few little…

One cannot travel to Antarctica without immediately thinking about those who came before. And one name in particular always stands out: Sir Ernest Shackleton, whose adventures through the ice are some of the more iconic expeditions of all time. Andrew Evans reflects on retracing Shackleton’s footsteps, and the nature of exploration now.   Maybe I’ve…

We have a sneaking suspicion that Andrew Evans traveled the entire 10,000 miles by bus just to hang out with penguins.   You don’t have to remind me: I know how lucky I am. I am lucky to travel so much and I am luckiest of all for getting to see so many penguins. I…

Andrew Evans is back from Antarctica, but he’s still blogging for us here at Intelligent Travel. Today he details the bleak, inhospitable conditions he found in the British Overseas Territory of South Georgia.   If you haven’t figured it out yet–I like really remote places. Barren, bleak, far flung–the less accessible, the better. You’d think…

The Bus2Antarctica journey continues, as Andrew Evans unpacks his bags and downloads the infinite videos he took while traveling on board the National Geographic Explorer. Today’s topic of interest: Seals.   I used to be one of those kids at the zoo with my face pressed against the glass, gazing underwater at the seals twisting…

Antarctica’s South Georgia Island has a population of several million penguins. I know that for a fact because I think I took that many pictures of them. One of those penguins happened to be black–all black–and perhaps you noticed, that one penguin’s been getting a bit of attention lately. Several people have asked if I…

Andrew Evans has returned from Antarctica, and is now slightly more famous thanks to his black penguin sighting. But he’s still got a lot more of the story to tell…   There are no elephants on Elephant Island. I know because I checked. The odd name derives from the huge populations of elephant seals–giant marine…

Andrew Evans may be stuck in Ushuaia, waiting to find his way home, but here on the blog his trip continues, as we’ve only scratched the surface in terms of Antarctic content. In today’s post, Andrew explores the desolate outpost on Deception Island, where he actually went for a swim. There is a reason that…

Andrew Evans takes us along for a cruise on board the National Geographic Explorer. This is not a pleasure cruise–Lindblad Expeditions is quite clear that the experience they offer is one of real exploration and expedition. On so many days I’m up and out on the front deck before six in the morning in order…

Andrew Evans, we love you, but today you’re killing us with jealousy.

Andrew Evans takes a moment to follow in other explorers’ footsteps and name a piece of Antarctica. By the time humans entered the modern age, we had already assigned names to most everything on our planet. Then came Antarctica–a whole continent filled with mountains, glaciers and penguins all waiting to be named. The naming of…

Andrew Evans explores the Antarctic Peninsula. I think weather is the only thing that really matters in Antarctica–weather and luck. And I think most every Antarctic explorer would agree with me. Scott had a turn of bad weather–he and his team perished. Shackleton had a good wind that carried him all the way to South…

Andrew Evans reflects on his six weeks of haphazard bus-filled travels, and the wonder of actually setting foot on Antarctica. You’ve all been very patient readers. Thank you. I’ve been waiting a long time, too. It’s taken me six weeks to get to Antarctica and I’ve found out that the closer I get, the less…

For Andrew Evans, passing over the Antarctic Circle was akin to crossing a sacred finish line. I’ve crossed a lot of lines on this journey–state lines, borderlines, the equator, both tropics (Cancer and Capricorn), along with the many ticket lines that stood between me and my ultimate southern goal. Out of all these lines the…

Andrew Evans offers us a glimpse inside his cabin on board the National Geographic Explorer. Anyone else feel like stowing away? Andrew Evans is tweeting about his travels aboard the National Geographic Explorer at @Bus2Antarctica. Want more? Follow the map of his journey, bookmark all of his blog posts, watch videos, and get the full…

Andrew Evans encounters his first iceberg on his way to Antarctica (while wearing a penguin shirt, naturally). Just like the very first Antarctic explorers (Ross, Wilkes, and Captain Cook), my first sign that I was getting warmer (i.e. getting closer) showed up in the form of this giant ice cube that bobbed in the sea…

After traveling through the Americas by bus, Andrew Evans boarded the MV National Geographic Explorer and set sail for Antarctica. Waiting a lifetime for your dream to come true one day–well, that’s hard. Waiting one whole day for that lifelong dream to come true is harder still. And yet, that is what must be done…

National Geographic Traveler contributing editor Andrew Evans traveled for over 45 days, taking buses from Washington D.C. through the Americas with one mission in mind: Getting on board the boat that would take him to Antarctica. Here, he describes the bliss of actually climbing onto the deck of the MV National Geographic Explorer. The world’s…

Nobody said getting to Antarctica by bus would be easy, but even Andrew Evans didn’t think he’d feel this close to death as he crossed the Strait of Magellan. I almost died on my last bus. I think it was the “almost” that was so terrifying. Never mind my crossing of militarized Colombia or dodging…

While waiting for his last bus to Ushuaia, Andrew Evans spent three days in the windy city of Rio Gallegos. Watch out Chicago. You’ve got competition. After three days in Rio Gallegos, I can vouch that its reputation for high and constant winds holds merit. For so many travelers, Rio Gallegos marks the end of…

After traveling 7,000 miles by bus through the Americas, Andrew Evans found the gold standard of buses in Argentina. As far as buses are concerned, I saved the best for last. I’m so glad. Had I started my journey on an Argentine bus, I would have been spoiled rotten right from the beginning. Every bus…

We continue with our blog recaps of Andrew Evans’ journey to Antarctica. In today’s dispatch, Andrew challenges you not to salivate after watching this video. Travel makes me hungry. After a month of riding buses I’ve learned to pack light and eat light while en route. But after 30 or 40 hours on the road,…

Andrew Evans recounts his race to reach Ushuaia before his boat left for Antarctica. One country, five buses, seven days. Argentina is a huge country. I suppose I was aware of that fact beforehand–subconsciously–but traveling the entire length of the country in person really drives the point home. Pun intended, I guess. I entered into…

Andrew Evans explores Bolivia’s vast salt flats. I can’t think of a worse torture than coming to Bolivia for the first time and then having to rush across the country in under a week. It’s like taking a kid to Disney World for the first time and then telling him he has 10 minutes before…