Tag archives for andrew evans

No discussion about global warming is complete without a nod to the Maldives, the paradisaical Indian Ocean archipelago that spans the equator, comprised of around 1,200 islands. Indeed, the geographical term atoll comes from the Dhivehi word describing these low-lying coral isles that almost seem to float on the flat blue surface of a tropical…

Is it possible to fall in love with a place in just one day? Yes, of course. The answer is yes. After leaving London on National Geographic’s 125th Anniversary Expedition, we flew to Oman, and shifted suddenly from the cooler fall of Europe into the steamy season of the Gulf. In total, I believe we…

Flying to Barra

“Boarding pass?” I dug the card from my bag and handed it to the woman at the shop in the Glasgow Airport—her nametag said “Lauren”, her straight brown hair fell to her shoulders, and her nose was pierced with a barely-there gold stud. “Where you flying to?” she wondered aloud, but I only stared back…

Andrew in Alberta

After nearly two full weeks on the road, I bring you the fully-finished, half-hour long TV show highlighting my very recent travels in Alberta. My aim in making this video was to capture all the things I love best about Alberta: the sheer size of the place, the awesome nature and vast wilderness, the animals…

Who knew it was so wildly hot in western Canada? I did not—because I only know this place in winter, when the snow falls deeper than the deep end at the swimming pool and the wind warrants a scarf and long underwear. But now, in August, Alberta is nothing but wide blue skies and semicolon…

All travel is a gift, but traveling with another person is a rare privilege of insight. To travel with a friend is to find a new closeness and to see the world in a whole new light. Though I have traveled to Iceland again and again, I saw it through new eyes by traveling with…

Iceland is a bit of a misnomer. The country’s frigid name was a bit of a knee-jerk response by the old Norse explorer Flóki Vilgerðarson, who, after suffering a calamitous winter in the West Fjords, climbed a mountain in hope for some hopeful sight and instead encountered a bay that was filled with icebergs (most…

If I have one travel pet peeve (more than surly TSA agents, or long check-in lines at the airport, or carbohydrate-heavy in-flight meals), it is travelers who use the verb “To Do” in referring to a destination in the world. e.g. “Last summer, I did Europe” or the frequently-heard, “Someday I want to do Australia…

At the very moment of the final top ten round of the the 25th anniversary National Geographic Bee (congrats Sathwik Karnik!), yours truly was sitting on a stool in a glass-walled television studio at 30 Rockefeller Place undergoing a more gentle interrogation on the Today Show. The questions asked me each concerned the upcoming holiday…

Going Home

I was born in Texas. It was the Seventies, Gerald Ford was president, and my father worked for an oil company. Beyond the distinct toddler memory of my crawling on the brown shag carpeting of our Houston home, I remember nothing of my birthplace. I remember leaving, though. Our family piled into our big Dodge…

Dear @GioPalatucci, I write you from the very dry heart of Tanzania where the ground is very brown, the grass is lion-colored and the trees look like they could all use a bit of water. I tell you Gio, it is everything you imagine Africa to be: forever skies with evasive clouds, the hot, hot…

It takes nearly six hours to fly across the Sahara Desert — —about the same distance it takes to fly across the United States. Indeed, the biggest desert in the world is as wide as the continental U.S., and from high up in the sky, I was able to take in the sea of sand…

From the air, India is an immense puzzle— –a hazy puzzle of dusted field and clustered village, with broken beige roads like sun-bleached branches on a dead tree. Down below, pixelated city blocks resemble the square doodles I draw and fill in mindlessly when I am back at home, sitting on hold and waiting for…

Every day I get about fifty comments/messages/e-mails in which readers ask me if they can have my job and my short answer is, “Yes, you can.” At least . . . you can do what I do, which is to travel and share your story with the world. Long before I was christened Digital Nomad…

Your kind face makes me stop, Your eyelashes so arresting That from my bike, I hop. Rip clumps of grass in offering.   You inquire with a wiggly nose With careful lips you chomp On lavender and wild rose Then take a perfumed dump.   The slanted fields of Switzerland Demand a steady foot. How…

There is no such thing as the Swiss Dictionary. I know because I’ve been searching for one ever since I began plotting my trip to Europe’s little landlocked country in the middle. Yes, there are a few Swiss German dictionaries in print and even one half-baked Swiss German app that I downloaded for 99 cents,…

HOME

I live here. That’s what I tell myself as I walk the square and triangle blocks of America’s capital city: this is where I live. This is where I have an address and where I have plants that need watering. I know folks on the street and they know me. I live here and recognize…

Glaciers taste good, as I discovered in Norway. When it’s 85°F outside and you’ve been hiking for an hour, a big mouthful of ancient icepack tastes better than any Slurpee ever could. The diamond, sparkling ice is cold, wet, clean, and delicious–not to mention endless and all-U-can-eat. (Almost.) My journey through Norway continues to be…

Travel is such a personal thing: one man’s art museum is another man’s prison. Personally, I can feel highly entertained just browsing in a bookstore (though if you want to kill me with boredom, plop me in the middle of a golf course.) This is precisely why I shy away from instructing readers what to…

Hello! Goeie Dag! Molo Kunjani! Welcome to beautiful Cape Town, where I’ve landed my feet for a good little while. From the moment I stepped off my ship and ventured into this city by the sea, I’ve been amazed at how friendly everybody is. And I really mean that. Cape Town is a city of…

Welcome to Cape Town . . . again. I’m back! So welcome back to this colorful seaside port that I only just recently came to know and which I’ve been desperately missing ever since I left. Since first landing here two weeks ago (aboard the National Geographic Explorer), I have clocked some 25,000 miles by…

Sometimes I choose my destinations and sometimes they choose me. Malawi was a little bit of both: first and foremost, there were some wonderful children that I needed to meet. However, as a lifelong reader of National Geographic, I have always harbored a wish to see the great Lake Malawi for myself and if possible,…

Read the full news report from Nat Geo Newswatch. Yesterday, the President of Malawi, Bingu wa Mutharika died from a heart attack. I first heard the rumors about the president’s failing health outside a sugar ration line in central Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi, where I was told that the he had collapsed and was…

In Africa, to dance is to live. Ever since I arrived in Malawi, it seems that I have been surrounded on all sides by impromptu dancing. Just clap your hands or bang a drum, and someone within earshot will start dancing. Dancing is also one of the principle education methods for  Save The Children’s HEART…

I admit that my job at National Geographic is a lot of fun. One minute I am blowing up snowdrifts, the next I am dusting away the secrets of Mesoamerican doomsday prophecies, rapping in Japanese, or cuddling wolves. Every day is different and unexpected—as travel should be. But travel is not always fun. Sometimes it…