Andrew Evans is National Geographic's digital nomad--always traveling and always wired. Share in the adventure as he explores great destinations around the globe. Interact online in the comments and on Twitter: @WheresAndrew.

“The food gets better as you go west—you’ll see.” Gary nods knowingly with both hands on his knees, then leans back ever so slowly into his chair, as if he’s just revealed the theory of special relativity. His metal chair squeaks and the moppy grey dog in my lap raises her head. “Just make sure…

In Missouri, a garden hoe is the best tool for killing cobras. In the summer of 1953, Roland Parrish was working in his front yard, when a long black snake raised its head and spread its hood. One swift swipe with the hoe and the snake was dead. A week later, Roland’s neighbor Wesley saw…

“Oh, I remember the ambulance sirens!” The white-haired man shook his head and looked down at the floor, while I imagined the haunting wail and whirling red lights on the dark roadway up here in the hills of Missouri. “Oh, it was a terrible highway,” Bob continued. His wife Kathy stood next to him, silent…

The Sainte-Chapelle may be my favorite church in the world, and staring at the heavy tulips in Forest Park reminds me of those amazing stained-glass windows back in Paris, brilliant with color and the gold-trimmed spectacle of the 13th century. And yet Easter Sunday at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis is no less beautiful. The…

The Illinois road ends on an island in the stream—a sandy, almond-shaped isle covered with tall and unbending trees. The first bridge is just one lane, so I wait for the light to change green, then rumble up and over the water onto the island. The second bridge is now closed to auto traffic, so…

The Lincolns are having ham for dinner, which makes sense, because tomorrow is Easter. The pink plastic pork sits on an antique platter, surrounded by a dozen buttery biscuits fashioned from polyvinyl chloride. They look delicious. Seventy-five percent of the home is original, but the black silk top hat hanging in the hallway is not.…

“So, what do you remember about the road?” I ask. “Traffic!” laughs Jim, and the rest of the table echoes the word. “Traffic and more traffic! Real busy,” they add. “Narrow as hell,” says Harv, and his eyes stop, thinking back to that time in his life traveling down a road that no longer exists.…

I wanted a convertible— —a  red vintage convertible with shiny chrome rims and white leather seats. But the Enterprise at O’Hare didn’t have any of those. “You wanna Impala?” The guy asked, but it was white—and I’m allergic to renting white cars. One day on the road and white cars start looking like dirty underwear.…

There’s a piece of the road in the museum—square slabs of aged asphalt excised from west of Oklahoma City. I’ve never seen such a thing in a museum.  I have seen shrunken human heads and Tyrannosaurus teeth, polished suits of armor and a queen’s underpants, but never before have I seen a chunk of road…

Long before I ever jet set to London or Tokyo, and long before I sailed the oceans or bussed to Antarctica, I went on road trips, with my parents. Every summer we set off in our family van, rolling from one rest stop to the next, on to national parks and the beach and the…

Two flags hang in the garage: Cuba on the left, America on the right. In the middle of our group stands Luis Enrique González, dressed in a black Harley-Davidson T-shirt, his hair wrapped in a black bandana. Oversized motorcycles from yesteryear stand parked in a row—some red, one bright turquoise. “This one’s from 1938,” explains…

This National Geographic Expeditions Cuba Trip has offered a spectacular opportunity to meet Cubans on their home turf and share with them our own impressions of their country. Though we explored several other areas in Cuba, we began and ended our expedition in the capital, Havana. With 2.2 million inhabitants, it’s impossible to caption this…

We were walking in the same direction, but going different places. The old man carried a folded cloth sack, and I had my camera bag flung over one shoulder. He said hello first, and I reached out to shake his hand. His skin was mocha brown and paper thin—his body frail and his hair as…

New Havana

“I wanted to see Cuba,” explains one man in our group, “Before it changes.” We all nod in agreement, except for the two Cubans in the room, who simply smirk. “I’ve been hearing that for the last twenty years!” says Migdalia, our guide. And she’s right—I’ve been hearing (and saying) the same thing for the…

Back in 1996, not far from my house, someone walking through the park stumbled upon a gigantic stone covered in moss. Finding a rock in Rock Creek Park is not unusual, but when that rock turns out to be a gigantic marble vase as tall as me, adorned with a fierce eagle and a oxidized…

You don’t “drive” a dogsled. You simply hold on tight and try to not fall off. My team of Alaskan huskies only have one speed—forward, and as a dabbling amateur musher, I only have one function—to slow us down. I jump on the rubber drag pad whenever we rocket down steep slopes, or those moments…

Alaska in Winter

In case you didn’t notice, I’ve been on vacation. Last year offered some incredible adventures, but I am glad for this time at home to recharge my batteries and prepare for upcoming travel thrills.  Nevertheless, it’s hard for me to sit still for too long, and so I embarked on a little vacation journey to…

It’s been a grand year of great adventure, and though the clock is ticking the final seconds ’til 2014, I am glad for the chance to review all that we’ve been through in the past twelve months: I opened 2013 on the streets of Edinburgh, exploring the land of my forefathers before leaping back across…

‘Tis the season of snowy nights and short days, log fires and sleigh rides. It’s also the season of ice storms and slush piles and seasonal affective disorder—in other words, the perfect time to escape to somewhere else. This year, National Geographic celebrated all Four Seasons of Travel with our book by the same name.…

Number Four

Last week, I went to prison. Everyone told me I had to go—that’s just what you do when you go to Johannesburg. So I took a cab to the top of the hill and paid my ticket and joined the group. They were all South Africans—all young, all black, and all very fashionable. And then…

Maboneng

Nothing beats a local introduction to a misunderstood place, and for that, I owe everything to Meruschka. I am no stranger to South African cities. Last year I spent six weeks exploring South Africa’s schizophrenic East Coast-West Coast divide, delving equally into Cape Town and Durban for this year’s National Geographic documentary, “The World in…

Monday I’ve never been so intrigued by the sex lives of animals as to gawk at the television when David Attenborough is narrating mammalian copulation, but TV is quite a different matter than sitting ten feet away from a grown male lion as he impregnates one of the lionesses in his pride, with a growl.…

The Big Tree

With every new mile, South Africa continues to surprise me. One minute I am watching a thousand black-feathered ostriches kicking up the pink dust of the dry Karoo. The next, I see the ocean, wild and white, thrashing the immense sand dunes along the coast, and then, just as the road sign welcomes me to…

Elephants are big creatures, weighing up to 15,000 lbs (much more than a car), and while they are intelligent and gentle, they can also be potentially dangerous to humans, simply because they are so big, versus our own species which is relatively small. Seeing elephants on safari is always remarkable and exciting, and occasionally (if…

The Cave

Limestone caves are like McDonalds—they’re pretty much all the same and they’re pretty much everywhere. The overbearing similitude of karst caves dissuades me from prioritizing them as tourist attractions—when you’re underground and it’s dark, you could be in France, Vietnam, Mexico, or the Luray Caverns of Virginia—all places where what’s happening on the surface is…