Archives for June, 2011

I’ve never been struck by lightning and I’m fine with that. It’s not something I aspire to. Nor did I wish to participate in one of the “hundreds and hundreds” of shipwrecks sitting along the murky bottom of the Great Lakes. I just wanted to get out on the lake. Mine was simply meant to…

Our Digital Nomad, Andrew Evans, is in Ontario sharing his travel adventures via photography, tweets, and video (just to name a few.) This recent dispatch comes from the most powerful waterfall in North America, Niagara Falls. Read more about this latest adventure, and follow along with Andrew on Twitter and Facebook. Niagara Falls by iPhone…

I like fishing for the places fishing takes me. It’s no secret that fishermen follow the fish, which means that a lot of fishermen travel a lot. It’s fishing that brought me to Thunder Bay and beyond to the uttermost wilds of Western Ontario. This is a land of rushing blue streams (the water is…

You can’t visit Ontario and not visit Niagara Falls. Because these are the most powerful waterfalls in all of North America and they are too big, too beautiful and too wondrous to pass up, especially if you can get a helicopter ride to fly over them.

Whenever I walk through a “bad” neighborhood, I can’t help but wonder:  If the modern city marks the pinnacle of human civilization, then what comes after? Progress and industry changed the city of Hamilton, Ontario from a small lakeside hamlet into the clanging metal monolith that was “Steeltown” Canada. The ride lasted long enough, but…

Our Digital Nomad, Andrew Evans, is in Ontario sharing his travel adventures via photography, tweets, and video (just to name a few.) His latest dispatch comes from the town of Brantford and the homestead of Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone and one of the original founders of the National Geographic Society. Read more…

Had he been on Twitter, @AGBell would have only had one follower. Historic accounts paint him as a friendly enough guy, but for all of his charms and great fame, his earliest telephones only allowed for a single, one-way conversation to take place: one person spoke and the receiver listened. That must have been tough.…

So what did you get up to this weekend? I went camping—in the woods, with my phone. After so much bed-and-breakfast fanciness, I was in the mood for some low-class peace and quiet and a bit of outdoor grit. Luckily, I didn’t have to travel that far. Bronte Creek Provincial Park is a nice big…

I’ve never posted a recipe before. Perhaps it’s rather old-ladylike of me, but please understand: I lived in England for four years and despite many delicious scones, none of them compared to the one I just discovered here in Ontario. See, good food and good travel go hand in hand. Whatever we eat on our…

The Bomb

It’ll be hard to top this one, folks. I’ve only been in Ontario for three days and I’m already shell-shocked by its sheer magnificence. The weather’s been great, so is the food, wish you were here, blah, blah . . . oh, and I just flew on a World War II bomber. (For real.) Yesterday…

Bike Hike

Have you ever dodged Canada geese on your bike? It was a first for me, too, but it was a great way to kick off my time in Canada and I loved being able to get so close to so many of these giant birds (I forgot how huge a goose can be). Those of…

So I took a cab to Canada. My fare to travel from the United States into Ontario totaled $10.60. (That was, until I was not so randomly made to pull over for a rather lengthy interrogation and my driver left the meter running. Sigh.) But, the point is . . . Ontario is close—so close…

Here at National Geographic our mission is to “inspire people to care about the planet.” Today on World Oceans Day, we help place a call to action to preserve one of the planet’s most important natural resources. This ode to the ocean by our Digital Nomad, Andrew Evans– who sailed across the Atlantic aboard the…

They say the journey matters more than the destination and for my month-long Atlantic crossing, that my very well have been the case. However, if one’s final stop is Dakar, as was mine, then the destination becomes a separate journey all by itself, if only for a few hours. After the rare and barely-inhabited islands…

After some 29 days at sea, I reached the Equator, having sailed all the way from South Georgia, a distance of some 55° of latitude. Some of you already know how I have this funny attraction to imaginary lines on the globe, as well as all borders between any two countries. The last time I…